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FINANCIAL CHRONICLE™ » EXPERT CHRONICLE™ » Discussion on Alternative Investment

Discussion on Alternative Investment

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kelumhewage


Manager - Equity Analytics
Manager - Equity Analytics
Discussion on Alternative Investment - Page 3 Types-10

just need to find out because of share market frustration i have and just thought of looking for a  new  invesment and also need to find out the reliability and productivity of this so called investment..

please have some time to give me a genuine idea about this and all comment are welcome warmly...

thought of this is gonna give me peace of mind and all possible posssitve and negetive comments...

experts call.... Question



Last edited by Quibit on Thu Nov 19, 2020 10:43 pm; edited 2 times in total (Reason for editing : Title changed)

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Post Thu May 03, 2012 11:17 am by UKboy

BTW I have one out of topic type question if anyone knows the answer.

Can we import ebony wood/furnitures to Sri Lanka? Or transport already manufactured ebony furniture within Sri Lanka?
I heard that cut down ebony trees ("Kaluwara") is banned in Sri Lanka.

Post Thu May 03, 2012 11:34 am by Sudee

@ Manula,

Cinnamon of course i don't know. Coz since i'm in dry zone this in not within our reach.
My father does cashew plantation as well. Just like coconut & teak, this is also undertaken in the dry zone. I forgot to mention this earlier plus i'm not aware of this much.
Anyway, i would just compare this with those two plantation like this.

Initial investment: More than teak, but less than coconut
Harvesting: I think after 2-3 years (sooner than coconut)
Maintenance: Easier than coconut, but harder than teak.
Fertilizer: Much lower when compared with coconut
Harvesting: Normally it's done annually. But i think there are new varieties that can be harvested semi - annually.
(If u do in small scale, u have to stay in the estate through out the harvesting season, may be two three months) If you are interest tell me, i would be able to give more detail.

Eco tourism
Most of the hotels in Sri lanka don't like Indians. Sorry, even if there are Indians in this forum. However, there are few good people as well. My experience is that, Indians who stay two or more nights are normally OK. They come to visit SL. As i know, this segment is small.
Most of the Indians come to SL as transit guest. They stay max one night in a hotel near Katunayake or Negombo. This segment is Big & Worst. Plus, Indians are not interested at Eco. They look for luxuries. So if u do an Eco hotel i don't think that u will get Indians & also don't look at that market.

Middle east guests like to visit SL up country than others. Hope u agree with me. What the hotels say is it is better to have some guest at least to B/E. So they look for Middle east market.

On top of this, if your planning to enter foreign tourist market, investment is very high as u want to get at least some stars. ( 2 or 3 at least)
My idea is that its good to start such projects targeting the locals. I see a improvement in travelling, enjoying & relaxing among the Sri lankans now. There is a growing demand for good places.
Thereafter, internet can be used to promote & sell the packages to foreigners, avoiding the tour operators. Once u get establish well, u may look for the charter guests, coz that gives u some assured sales, plus that will give access to high spending markets like Scandinavian & English.

However, when there are foreign guests who stay even the whole season in a beach resort on BB, average stay in an hill country hotel may be well below 10 nights. I believe that even the Eco hotels wont have long stay guests. So need to analyse these scenarios in depth, before moving ahead.

Post Thu May 03, 2012 12:22 pm by manula

@Sudee wrote:@ Manula,

Cinnamon of course i don't know. Coz since i'm in dry zone this in not within our reach.
My father does cashew plantation as well. Just like coconut & teak, this is also undertaken in the dry zone. I forgot to mention this earlier plus i'm not aware of this much.
Anyway, i would just compare this with those two plantation like this.

Initial investment: More than teak, but less than coconut
Harvesting: I think after 2-3 years (sooner than coconut)
Maintenance: Easier than coconut, but harder than teak.
Fertilizer: Much lower when compared with coconut
Harvesting: Normally it's done annually. But i think there are new varieties that can be harvested semi - annually.
(If u do in small scale, u have to stay in the estate through out the harvesting season, may be two three months) If you are interest tell me, i would be able to give more detail.

Eco tourism
Most of the hotels in Sri lanka don't like Indians. Sorry, even if there are Indians in this forum. However, there are few good people as well. My experience is that, Indians who stay two or more nights are normally OK. They come to visit SL. As i know, this segment is small.
Most of the Indians come to SL as transit guest. They stay max one night in a hotel near Katunayake or Negombo. This segment is Big & Worst. Plus, Indians are not interested at Eco. They look for luxuries. So if u do an Eco hotel i don't think that u will get Indians & also don't look at that market.

Middle east guests like to visit SL up country than others. Hope u agree with me. What the hotels say is it is better to have some guest at least to B/E. So they look for Middle east market.

On top of this, if your planning to enter foreign tourist market, investment is very high as u want to get at least some stars. ( 2 or 3 at least)
My idea is that its good to start such projects targeting the locals. I see a improvement in travelling, enjoying & relaxing among the Sri lankans now. There is a growing demand for good places.
Thereafter, internet can be used to promote & sell the packages to foreigners, avoiding the tour operators. Once u get establish well, u may look for the charter guests, coz that gives u some assured sales, plus that will give access to high spending markets like Scandinavian & English.

However, when there are foreign guests who stay even the whole season in a beach resort on BB, average stay in an hill country hotel may be well below 10 nights. I believe that even the Eco hotels wont have long stay guests. So need to analyse these scenarios in depth, before moving ahead.

@sudee... yes ECHO tourism also good idea.. as you mentioned i think starting a project targeting local tourism will be a good idea.. I am fully agree with you. But that cost also will be some high and then wages/maintaince etc ..will be extra cost ...and we have to relay on the guest..this is the main factor...
Same time i think best will be teak plantation... i mean for overseas worker like me with little activites.. only we have to look after carefully when the tree is in small days and after 10/15y your profit is guarnateed.
many of my friends worked in overseas started differnt projects.. different type of investments.. this is my thinking only. like to know the ideas wel come...

Post Thu May 03, 2012 12:30 pm by Sudee

@ UKboy,

I'm not aware about importing "Kaluwara". I just referred the import custom duty guide line 2011 and according to that Ebony can be imported without a control licence, and at zero duty... Only VAT, PAL & NBT.

In SL, it is illegal and not permit will be issued neither to cut down nor transport Kaluwara. Keeping it as timber in a furniture making shop or keeping furniture made out of Kaluwara in a furniture show are even illegal according to my knowledge. But then, if you can import timber, this is a contradict???

There are furniture vendors who claim this is Kaluwara n sell at premium prices. There are some other woods which has a black core and hence using a good finishing they can also be made to look like Kaluwara.

However, in the current Srilankan context, it is not so difficult to sell even the real Kaluwara furniture (made out of trees cut in SL) in shops as well. Coz our police and forest officers are as such.

Monster

Post Sat May 12, 2012 1:40 pm by Monster

For those who are interested

Discussion on Alternative Investment - Page 3 Coconu10

http://www.dailynews.lk/epaper/art.asp?id=2012/05/12/pg19_0&pt=p&h=

UKboy

Post Sat May 19, 2012 1:45 pm by UKboy

Hi Sudee Thank you very much for your explanation on Ebony wood. Yes looks like the laws are a bit contradict Rolling Eyes
Cheers

Backstage

Post Sat May 19, 2012 7:13 pm by Backstage

Hi Sudee,
A friend has some 30 year old teak trees in Wariyapola that he wants to sell, he says the trees don't have a very large girth but has plenty of aratuwa. The local buyers are said to be offering low prices and he doesn't know how to find other buyers. Would be much obliged if you can give some pointers.

BTW he had planted about 400 trees to an acre and has done minimum maintenance. Could this be the factor for the reduced girth ? he is also in the low rainfall area of Wariyapola.

avatar

Post Mon May 21, 2012 11:03 am by Sudee

@backstage,

Are you sure that he has planted 400/acre?
Normally it should be about 200...
It's very simple, the tree won't get the required amount of sun rays.
I think the trees must be very tall? (due to this condition)
Anyway, can u give the measurement of the girth? (take this measurement at about 7 feet height from the ground)
And the price those vendors are offering? So that i would be able to tell whether it's reasonable.

Has he contacted Moratuwa vendors?
How many trees is he planning to sell? Based on the number i would be able to suggest you vendors.

If trees are matured well as you have told, the girth is not a big issue. I mean, if it is 30 years old, it should have some reasonable girth.

FALCON

Post Mon May 21, 2012 12:43 pm by FALCON

Dear Sudee

Where can i buy the sandal wood plants?

thanks

stumpy

Post Tue May 22, 2012 10:13 am by stumpy

@Sudee wrote:@backstage,

Are you sure that he has planted 400/acre?
Normally it should be about 200...
It's very simple, the tree won't get the required amount of sun rays.
I think the trees must be very tall? (due to this condition)
Anyway, can u give the measurement of the girth? (take this measurement at about 7 feet height from the ground)
And the price those vendors are offering? So that i would be able to tell whether it's reasonable.

Has he contacted Moratuwa vendors?
How many trees is he planning to sell? Based on the number i would be able to suggest you vendors.

If trees are matured well as you have told, the girth is not a big issue. I mean, if it is 30 years old, it should have some reasonable girth.

Looks like he hasn't done Thinning Process properly!
Properly managed plantation is having 160 trees per acre after 18 years!
400 is way too high number for a commercial teak plantation with 30 year old trees!
So... Sudi, in this case dbh or girth must be lower than usual!
Really sorry for your friend Backstage!

avatar

Post Tue May 22, 2012 10:30 am by Sudee

Sorry, i have no much idea about sandal wood.
Anyway, you may try following places.

Department of Ayurveda +94 11 2896911 / +94 11 2896911
Agriculture info help line 1920
Forest Department 0112866631, 0112866632, 0112875540

BTW, how many plants you want?
If it's small number i may b able to suggest u private vendors who plant them in small scale.



avatar

Post Tue May 22, 2012 10:34 am by Sudee

@stumpy,

Yep ur correct.
Anyway, lets see what we can suggest to his friend.

stumpy

Post Tue May 22, 2012 12:52 pm by stumpy

@BS >
Rainfall @ Wariyapola is more than enough for Teak!

@Sudi
My suggestions>

1 > Selling the land with tress for an unknown party Razz Just kidding... as usual! lol!

2 > Trying to find a buyer who wants "Aratuwa" > than "Wata Adi"
(who know the real value of heart than the outer appearance Razz eth ehema evun hoyana eka thamai amaaru! coz, this is a business)

3 > Trying to find a direct supplier to Moratuwa or may be to an Exporter!

4 > mm.... I'll PM if I get another crazy idea! Very Happy

@Sudi
I forgot to mention!
I've gone through the entire thread with much interest!
I respect ur extensive knowledge n experience regarding coconut plantations!
Hoping to have some consultations sooner than later Very Happy

Backstage

Post Tue May 22, 2012 1:22 pm by Backstage

Passed the information to my friend,who said he will measure the girth and tell me.
His main crop is coconut with some mango and Cashew. At the time of planting he the forest dept guys had told him to plant 10 feet apart which he had done,(is that how you get 200/acre?) but just left them to grow without thinning or any type of maintenance(my friend is not the most dynamic person around). So its a teak jungle with a lot of smaller trees growing in between and not a plantation.
He now tells me that he hasn't actually asked the local buyers as they then start harassing him and coming daily to see the trees.(that's not what he said when he was with his wife) So he is a bit of a reluctant seller with his wife pushing him to sell to improve their cash flow.
Thanks Sudee/Stump for taking the time, will post when he gets back to me.I too am looking for some trees as I am building a house.

stumpy

Post Tue May 22, 2012 2:09 pm by stumpy

Oh! no! It's called Social Forestry plus Family commitments Razz

Initial spacing for planting teak stumps is 3m x 3m after land preparations!
After that we have to follow pruning & general plantation management practices!

Then we have to do pre-commercial thinning after 8 - 12 years which don't have a timber value! Usually we're doing a commercial thinning (which has a timber value) after 18 years depending on factors such as geography, rainfall & demand etc! By that time we'll only have 160 trees per acre! Final felling is done 22-25 years in commercial plantations!

@Backstage wrote:
He now tells me that he hasn't actually asked the local buyers as they then start harassing him and coming daily to see the trees.
Oh! Kunu kollayata "Purchasing Trees" is a very common practice in our country Razz

+ Lack of knowledge is a major concern! Very Happy

I'm more than happy to learn Agro-Forestry stuff! he he!

Backstage

Post Tue May 22, 2012 2:41 pm by Backstage

Thanks for the info stump, I am also planning to acquire some land close to Puliyankulam for teak. My roofing carpenter says that there are different varieties of teak growing in SL with differing qualities. Do you know anything about that?
BTW according to my friend the official rainfall line crosses Wariyapola and the rain actually stops a couple of kms from his land which is on the Padeniya road just past the so called rain line. It apparently happens every year.

Chinwi

Post Tue May 22, 2012 3:04 pm by Chinwi

Ha Ha . Glad to learn many are now looking towards plantation / forestry.
At -least good for our environment. Smile

If some one wanted to know about Sandalwood plantation let me know. I will try to write (here) what I know .

Remember they are not just trees. They are semi-parasites.
Sandalwood tree is not capable to get its all NPK like other trees do. Hence, we have to provide proper supportive plants and feed them too.

Note about Teak : as stumpy said more rain will give you bad Teak.

Backstage

Post Tue May 22, 2012 3:23 pm by Backstage

This is more interesting than our sideways market.

I have a small patch of land close to Belihuloya that I am planing on blocking and selling, on that land white Sandlewood used to grow wild. Quite a bit of it has been stolen but a few are left. I will see if there are any small plants around. Even small branches are stolen, sometimes killing the tree.

FALCON

Post Tue May 22, 2012 3:34 pm by FALCON

@Chinwi
@Backstage

Thank you

smallville

Post Tue May 22, 2012 4:54 pm by smallville

Here we go.. after a long time a nice alternative investment idea know?

Keep it up and keep your thoughts/ expertise coming in...

stumpy

Post Tue May 22, 2012 8:10 pm by stumpy

@Small:
huh! thanks for the cheer up mate!
What about that bloody meet up?
I saw that missed call, will call back later boss! Wink

@Chinwi wrote:Ha Ha . Glad to learn many are now looking towards plantation / forestry.
At -least good for our environment. Smile

If some one wanted to know about Sandalwood plantation let me know. I will try to write (here) what I know .

Remember they are not just trees. They are semi-parasites.
Sandalwood tree is not capable to get its all NPK like other trees do. Hence, we have to provide proper supportive plants and feed them too.

Note about Teak : as stumpy said more rain will give you bad Teak.


Yaaay Master,
Glad to see you again after a long time!
Hope you're doing great! Once I sent you a PM! Hope u haven't seen it! I'll send it to you once again Very Happy

BTW FYI, I was interested in Agriculture/Forestry even before coming to CSE! Very Happy ha ha!

@Backstage
Generally we're using major variety Tectona Grandis! There can be some sub species too! But there's no major change in timber volume or pest resistance! Our forest department is having healthy orchards but they're not selling seeds or ready-made teak stumps as I know! But again it's a GOV institute! If you know what I mean! Razz

If you're considering alternatives in Dry Zone, long leaved Mahogany Swietenia Microphylla (not the broad leaved one which is planted in Wet Zone) or "African Mahogany" (a perfect choice) can be considered with other local varieties such as Nandun, Burutha etc!

Land vs rainfall
Ayyo! Poor Fellow! How unlucky he is! Smile
What about investing in some irrigation method, may be for next cropping cycle? Very Happy
If you're serious about plantation forestry, visit the selected land 2-3 times in different seasons with a thermometer, ph meter n other stuff & specially do a soil sample testing before the original purchase! Those villagers will think you're crazy! But again it's my car my patrol thingy! A friend of mine who wanted to plant Murunga escaped from such a scene coz of a simple soil test! There was a huge rock surface covering entire area few meters below his dream land!
And you'll call me Crazy because I'm spending 9-12 months before purchasing a land, but we're talking about an investment (timber) which give you returns after 15-25 years! Waiting for one year is nothing! Razz

Sandalwood
Villagers are using them for medicinal purposes & they think those parts (even the small sticks) can bring them luck! It's a general practice in those areas!

I'm a keen follower of Chinwi's way after doing a research about local plantation companies! he he!
And I'll start my own plantation company next year Very Happy

@Sudi,
Y u silent my dear friend?

avatar

Post Wed May 23, 2012 10:26 am by manula

@stumpy... as i mentioned in my previoues posts... in the same subject.. like to start teak cultivation/cocount.. but due to i am working overseas i think better is teak ..due to less maintenace ... hope good in long run..at leaset will be sutiable for the kids..any advice.. sutiable area.. or any..



Last edited by manula on Wed May 23, 2012 10:45 am; edited 1 time in total

Chinwi

Post Wed May 23, 2012 10:30 am by Chinwi

Stumpy
A friend of mine who wanted to plant Murunga escaped from such a scene coz of a simple soil test! There was a huge rock surface covering entire area few meters below his dream land!

This is a very important advise / observation. I have seen many people fail after purchasing lands due to this factor. There could be a thick layer of rock few meters below the beautiful land you purchased.
Most of the land-sale people who sell lands for housing purposes will preach you about readily available water but you may find a huge rocky mountain instead.

avatar

Post Wed May 23, 2012 10:54 am by manula

@manula wrote:@stumpy... as i mentioned in my previoues posts... in the same subject.. like to start teak cultivation/cocount.. but due to i am working overseas i think better is teak ..due to less maintenace ... hope good in long run..at leaset will be sutiable for the kids..any advice.. sutiable area.. or any..

Chinwi..like to know your comments also...

avatar

Post Thu May 24, 2012 9:09 am by Sudee

As i have no much knowledge about sandal wood and particularly wet zone plantations, was kept quite.

"If you're considering alternatives in Dry Zone, long leaved Mahogany Swietenia Microphylla (not the broad leaved one which is planted in Wet Zone) or "African Mahogany" (a perfect choice) can be considered with other local varieties such as Nandun, Burutha etc!"

Anyway, is there any person who has followed the above?
I mean, who has planted any of those trees?


Backstage

Post Tue May 29, 2012 2:50 pm by Backstage

My friend says the girth at 7 feet is about 3 feet and the trees are over50 feet in height. It is clear to me now that he has no intention of selling them. I don't know why as they have a son struggling with his college fees and my friend goes around in a beat up truck. But he is curious about the price. His wife is on the war path, hehe...
In the meantime I am looking for a big Mee tree for my roof.

About Sandlewood. There are roving buyers who visit the Belihuloya area and during those visits any unguarded Sandlewood disappears and I think for illegal export.

avatar

Post Tue May 29, 2012 3:12 pm by WildBear

Recently I found some. leisure sector investment projects at www.ideahomes.lk. It seems a novel concept to Sri Lanka. But I have no idea about this company. If any one know any thing, please share.
According to them you can own a 3 star luxury villa at St Clair falls site, for $ 15 000-20000 on profit sharing basis while they manage and market the properties.you can recover the investment in 3-4 years depending on occupancy.

Monster

Post Sun Jun 03, 2012 8:48 pm by Monster

Does anyone have any idea about horticulture industry. There are many companies do horticulture in north western province. Where can I get more information about this?

Chinwi

Post Mon Jun 04, 2012 1:17 am by Chinwi

@Monster wrote:Does anyone have any idea about horticulture industry. There are many companies do horticulture in north western province. Where can I get more information about this?

There is a separate unit in EDB for foliage business. They have some info and they will assist you to find buyers also.
Main thing is first you will have to grow few acres of foliage as they need continuous supply.

In NCP I have seen one person who exports cut foliage many years ago. I think he is still doing the business. There were about 30 girls working in his premises packing the stuff.
It was called " Decor Foliage" Address: "Rathnasiriya”, Meegahamula Watta, Pannala, Ibbagamuwa,,Sri Lanka
Proprietor: Mr. Gamini Rathnasiri - Managing Director Phone 94-37-225 9637

I heard there are many exporters in Gampaha area. They buy out-growers products.

In addition, I can give you some idea about pricing.

Some times ago I grew cane palm (Dypsis_lutescens) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dypsis_lutescens1.jpg) as a cut foliage. Collectors came to our place and paid Rs. 2.50 - 4.00 to us per branch. In Dubai I saw in the flower shops they sell it @ 2 Dirhams. I.e. 60.00 LKR. Naturally anyone will take this as a lucrative if we can export.
But this is how it happens:
Collectors sell it to the local exporter @ 5/- to 6/- . After cleaning and packing they export it by airfreight and main importer get it @ avr 15/- 20/- Rs. They distribute it to the local sellers in that country @ 30/- . the retail man sell it to the customers @ 60 /- . Transportation, salaries, tax , profits and other overheads included at each stage.
Somehow if we can become the grower and the retail seller that is nice.

If you grow these plants to sell locally as pot plants, a good business , you have to buy seedlings and pot them . They will take 8 months - 15 months to grow to a 2.5 ft bush.
If you plant 4-5 seedlings in a 10inch "Mal Pochchiya" the cost will be 75/-100/- . you can sell it 350 -500. after 1 year.
Bigger plants 1.5 year-2 year aged go over 2500/- @ Battaramulla plant shops. ( Former Mal Pradarshanaya at Wiharamahadevi park) Sometimes a single buyer buy 10- 15 plants @ 2500 each.

I know one person who supplied cane palm seedlings 15 years ago. I do not know his current position.
Mr. Nalaka Eknaligoda, Nilanka Nursery, 69/1, kandy road, Kurunegala. 0372233673 .

You can have a general idea if you visit Battaramulla weekend flower show near Waters Adge. Go and meet Mrs. Soma Nethsinghe. She is a good lady. (Some people may mislead you or lot of " Gurumushti")

In addition there are many other popular plant varieties including Aglonemas, orchids and Anthurium. Some people visit Thailand , bring plants and sell here at higher prices.

If you need info about orchid growing let me know. In 1980s I exported my flowers through Lakmalsala .
A flower called gerberra is popular these days. Some people go to Pune in India to bring Gerberra plants. Hayleys also breed and sell them in SL.

Monster

Post Mon Jun 04, 2012 10:56 am by Monster

Many thanks to your information Chinwi. I have sent you a PM.

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