FINANCIAL CHRONICLE™
Dear Reader,

Registration with the Sri Lanka FINANCIAL CHRONICLE™️ would enable you to enjoy an array of other services such as Member Rankings, User Groups, Own Posts & Profile, Exclusive Research, Live Chat Box etc..

All information contained in this forum is subject to Disclaimer Notice published.


Thank You
FINANCIAL CHRONICLE™️
www.srilankachronicle.com


Join the forum, it's quick and easy

FINANCIAL CHRONICLE™
Dear Reader,

Registration with the Sri Lanka FINANCIAL CHRONICLE™️ would enable you to enjoy an array of other services such as Member Rankings, User Groups, Own Posts & Profile, Exclusive Research, Live Chat Box etc..

All information contained in this forum is subject to Disclaimer Notice published.


Thank You
FINANCIAL CHRONICLE™️
www.srilankachronicle.com
FINANCIAL CHRONICLE™
Would you like to react to this message? Create an account in a few clicks or log in to continue.
FINANCIAL CHRONICLE™

Encyclopedia of Latest news, reviews, discussions and analysis of stock market and investment opportunities in Sri Lanka

LISTED COMPANIES

Submit Post
Poll

Can there be another Covid-19 wave in Sri Lanka?

 
 
 

View results

STOCK MARKET TRAINING
ශ්‍රී ලංකා මූල්‍ය වංශකථාව - සිංහල
Submit Post


CONATCT US


Send your suggestions and comments

* - required fields

Read FINANCIAL CHRONICLE™ Disclaimer


EXPERT CHRONICLE™

MARKET CHAT


CHRONICLE™ ANALYTICS


ECONOMIC CHRONICLE

GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT (GDP)


CHRONICLE™ YouTube


You are not connected. Please login or register

FINANCIAL CHRONICLE™ » CORPORATE CHRONICLE™ » What will happen with PC House (PCH) and Adam Investment (AINV)

What will happen with PC House (PCH) and Adam Investment (AINV)

Go down  Message [Page 1 of 1]

mcsshan1987


Stock Trader
I have 50000 shares for both PCH and AINV. What will happen to these shares? What action I have to do to get back my investment?

Teller

Teller
Moderator
Moderator
They will never come back.lets forget our money


_________________




Teller said is said..

mcsshan1987


Stock Trader
@Teller wrote:They will never come back.lets forget our money
Will it possible to take any legal action?

Teller

Teller
Moderator
Moderator
read below.

Common shareholders are still part owners of the business, and if the business can to turn a profit, common shareholders benefit. The liquidation preference we described above makes logical sense. Shareholders take on greater risk as they receive next to nothing if the firm goes bankrupt, but they also have a greater reward potential through exposure to share price appreciation when the company succeeds. In contrast, preferred stocks generally experience less price fluctuation.


Common Shareholders’ Main Rights
Voting Power on Major Issues. Voting power includes electing directors and proposals for fundamental changes affecting the company such as mergers or liquidation. Voting takes place at the company’s annual meeting. If the shareholder cannot attend, they can do so by proxy and mail in their vote.
Ownership in a Portion of the Company. Previously, we discussed a corporate liquidation where bondholders and preferred shareholders are paid first. However, when business thrives, common shareholders own a piece of something that has value. Common shareholders have a claim on a portion of the assets owned by the company. As these assets generate profits and as the profits are reinvested in additional assets, shareholders see a return as the value of their shares increases as stock prices rise.
The Right to Transfer Ownership. The right to transfer ownership means shareholders are allowed to trade their stock on an exchange. The right to transfer ownership might seem mundane, but the liquidity provided by stock exchanges is important. Liquidity—the degree to which an asset or security can be quickly bought or sold in the market without affecting the asset’s price—is one of the key factors that differentiate stocks from an investment such as real estate. If an investor owns the property, it can take months to convert that investment into cash. Because stocks are so liquid, investors can move their money into other places almost instantaneously.
An Entitlement to Dividends. Along with a claim on assets, investors also receive a claim to any profits the company pays out in the form of a dividend. Management of a company essentially has two options with profits: they can be reinvested back into the firm (thus, one hopes, increasing the company’s overall value) or paid out in the form of a dividend. Investors do not have a say as to what percentage of profits should be paid out—the board of directors decides this. However, whenever dividends are declared, common shareholders are entitled to receive their share.
Opportunity to Inspect Corporate Books and Records. Regulations require that public companies release their financials in the form of two annual reports: one for the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and one for their shareholders. Form 10-K is the annual report made to the SEC, and its content is strictly governed by federal statutes.
The Right to Sue for Wrongful Acts. Suing a company typically takes the form of a shareholder class-action lawsuit. For example, Worldcom faced a firestorm of shareholder class-action suits in 2002 when it was discovered that the company had grossly overstated earnings giving shareholders and investors an erroneous view of its financial health.


_________________




Teller said is said..

Sponsored content


Back to top  Message [Page 1 of 1]

Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum