FINANCIAL CHRONICLE™
Dear Reader,

Registration with the Sri Lanka FINANCIAL CHRONICLE™️ would enable you to enjoy an array of other services such as Member Rankings, User Groups, Own Posts & Profile, Exclusive Research, Live Chat Box etc..

All information contained in this forum is subject to Disclaimer Notice published.


Thank You
FINANCIAL CHRONICLE™️
www.srilankachronicle.com


Join the forum, it's quick and easy

FINANCIAL CHRONICLE™
Dear Reader,

Registration with the Sri Lanka FINANCIAL CHRONICLE™️ would enable you to enjoy an array of other services such as Member Rankings, User Groups, Own Posts & Profile, Exclusive Research, Live Chat Box etc..

All information contained in this forum is subject to Disclaimer Notice published.


Thank You
FINANCIAL CHRONICLE™️
www.srilankachronicle.com
FINANCIAL CHRONICLE™
Would you like to react to this message? Create an account in a few clicks or log in to continue.
FINANCIAL CHRONICLE™

Encyclopedia of Latest news, reviews, discussions and analysis of stock market and investment opportunities in Sri Lanka

Click Link to get instant AI answers to all business queries.
Click Link to find latest Economic Outlook of Sri Lanka
Click Link to view latest Research and Analysis of the key Sectors and Industries of Sri Lanka
Worried about Paying Taxes? Click Link to find answers to all your Tax related matters
Do you have a legal issues? Find instant answers to all Sri Lanka Legal queries. Click Link
Latest images

Latest topics

» Japanese Gratitude to Sri Lanka (日本の感謝)
by God Father Today at 12:13 am

» Maharaja Foods PLC (MFL) - IPO Analysis
by ChooBoy Mon Jul 22, 2024 12:27 am

» කොළඹ කොටස් වෙළඳපොල විශ්ලේෂණය - 2024
by ChooBoy Fri Jul 19, 2024 11:53 am

» Winds of Change: Sri Lanka's Banking Crisis is Stalling Renewable Energy Ambitions of Local Stalwarts of Wind & Solar Power
by God Father Wed Jul 17, 2024 10:11 pm

» Banking Sector Analysis
by God Father Sat Jul 13, 2024 7:57 am

» Impact of Elections on Colombo Stock Market Sentiment
by Quibit Tue Jul 09, 2024 9:01 am

» LankaBIZ Unveils AI-Driven On-Demand Financial Research and Analysis Service
by Quibit Thu Jul 04, 2024 12:49 pm

» CDB Non voting
by Nandun Sun Jun 30, 2024 9:45 pm

» The Parsi Power Play: How a Small Community of Iranian Parsis are Controling Sri Lanka's US $ 85 billion Economy & 22 Million Population & Politics driving away FDIs
by MalakaDesmond Sun Jun 30, 2024 10:19 am

» Richard Pieris Group: Mismanaged?
by Walbaba Sat Jun 29, 2024 7:04 pm

» සොෆ්ට්ලොජික් හෝල්ඩිංග්ස් පීඑල්සී: අඳුරු අපේක්ෂාවන් සහිත ඉහළ අවදානම් ආයෝජනයක්
by D.G.Dayaratne Tue Jun 25, 2024 5:45 am

» සොෆ්ට්ලොජික් ප්‍රාග්ධනයට වන්දි ගෙවන Share BuyBack නිසා Softlogic ජීවිත රක්‍ෂණය බංකොලොත් වීමේ අවදානමක
by MalakaDesmond Tue Jun 25, 2024 1:49 am

» Softlogic Life insurance face Danger of Bankruptcy due to Share BuyBack that compensate Softlogic Capital
by MalakaDesmond Tue Jun 25, 2024 1:33 am

» Softlogic Holdings PLC: A High-Risk Investment with Bleak Prospects
by MalakaDesmond Tue Jun 25, 2024 12:52 am

» FINANCE AND LEASING SECTOR
by SL-INVESTOR Sat Jun 22, 2024 12:48 am

» HSENID BUSINESS SOLUTIONS PLC (HBS.N0000)
by ErangaDS Wed Jun 19, 2024 9:21 pm

» How will proposed Tax Reforms affect Sri Lankans in 2025
by Quibit Wed Jun 19, 2024 9:27 am

» Falsified accounts and financial misrepresentation at Arpico Insurance PLC (AINS)
by ChooBoy Tue Jun 18, 2024 11:31 pm

» Impact of IMF reforms to Sri Lanka Economy
by D.G.Dayaratne Mon Jun 17, 2024 6:36 pm

» Richard Pieris Finance Ltd continue to endanger the Depositors with negative performance
by ddindika Mon Jun 17, 2024 3:17 pm

» Richard Pieris Exports reports 97% decline in Net Profits
by Biggy Sat Jun 15, 2024 11:26 am

» Do your own Stock Market Research using AI Tools
by Quibit Fri Jun 14, 2024 10:50 am

» What will happen tomorrow?
by cheetah Thu Jun 13, 2024 12:07 pm

LISTED COMPANIES

Submit Post
ශ්‍රී ලංකා මූල්‍ය වංශකථාව - සිංහල
Submit Post


CONATCT US


Send your suggestions and comments

* - required fields

Read FINANCIAL CHRONICLE™ Disclaimer



EXPERT CHRONICLE™

ECONOMIC CHRONICLE

GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT (GDP)



CHRONICLE™ YouTube


You are not connected. Please login or register

Sri Lanka Banking Sector highly vulnerable

+4
blindhog
reyaz
sheildskye
DeepFreakingValue
8 posters

Go down  Message [Page 1 of 1]

1Sri Lanka Banking Sector highly vulnerable Empty Sri Lanka Banking Sector highly vulnerable Thu Apr 06, 2023 12:03 am

DeepFreakingValue

DeepFreakingValue
Manager - Equity Analytics
Manager - Equity Analytics

Sri Lanka Banking Sector highly vulnerable. Page 78. IMF Report #Srilanka @CBSL
Download Report: https://www.imf.org/-/media/Files/Publications/CR/2023/English/1LKAEA2023001.ashx

Sri Lanka Banking Sector highly vulnerable 9283ab10
Sri Lanka Banking Sector highly vulnerable D2a4f710

1. The financial system is dominated by banks. Total assets of financial institutions amounted to 141 percent of GDP by the end of 2021. 32 commercial and specialized banks constitute 70 percent of total system assets. Four banks are designated by the CBSL as domestically systemically important. The nonbank financial institutions (NBFIs) consist mainly of deposit-taking Licensed Finance Companies (LFCs), pension funds, and insurance companies (see table below).

2. The state plays a key role in the financial sector. The two largest commercial banks are state-owned, accounting for over one third of total banking assets. Most specialized banks are fully or significantly government-owned, and the retirement fund sector is dominated by the government-owned Employees’ Provident Fund (EPF) and Employees’ Trust Fund (ETF), which manage over 90 percent of total retirement fund assets. The government also has indirect ownership stakes in several private banks through the state-owned banks and Employee’s Provident Fund.

3. The sovereign-bank nexus is very strong and impairment charges against public sector exposures remain lower than market valuations would imply. Public sector credit exposure accounts for more than 40 percent of banks’ assets, and higher at state-owned banks. More than two thirds of this exposure is in domestic currency, and around half in the form of Treasury bonds. Exposures in foreign currency include holdings of Sri Lanka’s International Sovereign Bonds (ISBs) and Sri Lanka Development Bonds (SLDBs), and state-owned bank loans to SOEs and the government. While banks have made substantial provisions against their holdings of ISBs in 2022, these still imply lower losses than market valuations of these bonds, which currently trade at prices below 40 percent of par. Banks therefore remain vulnerable to losses arising from debt restructuring. In addition, most local currency government bonds are now accounted for on an amortized cost basis and are booked at well above their current market value, as 10-year T-bond yields have risen to around 28 percent from 12 percent at end-2021.

4. NBFIs are heavily exposed to sovereign risk through their investments in government bonds. Pension funds are one of the largest holders of local currency government debt. The EPF holds around 29 percent of total domestic local currency government debt, with 94 percent of its investments in government debt. Similarly, the ETF invested 80 percent of its portfolio in government debt by 2021. In addition, insurance companies are also highly exposed to government debt. Exposures of insurance companies to government debt accounted for 431⁄2 percent of their assets.

5. Banks could face significant capital and FX shortfalls as a result of a sovereign debt restructuring. A sovereign debt restructuring will crystalize both sovereign credit risk and FX risk facing the banks. Banks’ exposure to the public sector as of end-September 2022 amounts to 33 percent of projected 2022 GDP, more than 5 times their total capital of 61⁄2 percent of GDP. Staff’s analysis indicates that, the illustrative restructuring scenario considered in the public debt sustainability analysis (Annex II), combined with a severe asset quality shock consistent with the economic downturn, could result in capital shortfalls for some banks. Private sector capital may be difficult to secure until the economy has stabilized, especially for the state-owned banks. The authorities have therefore committed in the MEFP to a plan for potential bank recapitalization and the DSA includes a contingent liability to reflect this.

6. Moreover, banks’ net open foreign exchange position would deteriorate significantly as a result of a sovereign debt restructuring. The depreciation of the rupee has increased the share of FX assets from 16 percent at end-2021 to 25 percent of banks’ assets. Restructuring of public FX debt, or repayment in rupees could cause banks’ FX liabilities to significantly exceed their FX assets. These FX short positions could lead to more losses if the rupee depreciates further, if banks are unable to secure sufficient FX inflows. Thus, banks and the authorities will also require a plan to close the net open FX position in the banking sector.

Download Report: https://www.imf.org/-/media/Files/Publications/CR/2023/English/1LKAEA2023001.ashx

DeepFreakingValue

DeepFreakingValue
Manager - Equity Analytics
Manager - Equity Analytics

Bank vulnerabilities built up during the pandemic as forbearance measures on loan repayment and provisioning were introduced.

External financing of the public sector had dried up earlier, strengthening the domestic sovereign-bank nexus, with public sector exposures accounting for more than 40 percent of bank assets. Although backward-looking reported capital ratios have remained stable, and high net interest margins have so far allowed banks to absorb rising impairments (Figure 5), the current crisis will continue to crystallize these vulnerabilities.

Banks are likely to face ongoing credit losses from sharply rising NPLs, while the restructuring or repayment in rupees of FX-denominated government securities (around 5 percent of bank assets) is expected to result in losses, worsen severe FX liquidity shortages, and create currency mismatches. The large state-owned banks have, in addition, substantial FX loans to the government and SOEs, which are expected to be restructured or repaid in Rupees. At the same time, the cost of rupee funding
remains well above CBSL policy rates (average rates on new deposits reached 23 percent in December) and some banks have seen periods of rupee liquidity stress. With banks’ seeking to conserve capital in anticipation of future losses, credit growth has turned negative since the depreciation of the rupee in 2022Q2.

As significant recapitalization needs are possible, including a public banks, the DSA also incorporates a contingency for recapitalization costs (Annex V).

PROGRAM RISKS AND CONTINGENCY PLANNING
Risks to program implementation are high, given adverse initial conditions, political risk, a complex debt restructuring with a potential for delay, ambitious fiscal consolidation, large downside risks to the baseline scenario, and Sri Lanka’s weak track record for reform and program implementation.

• Macroeconomic risks. Unexpected economic and financial developments as highlighted in ¶19 could deepen the crisis and complicate program implementation. Given elevated upside
inflationary pressure, the risk of persistently high inflation is significant (¶20).

Commitment to the ambitious fiscal consolidation targets and wide-ranging fiscal reforms. Historically, Sri Lanka has only had a primary surplus on three occasions, and never for more than two years; and fiscal consolidation efforts in Sri Lanka’s past IMF-supported programs were quickly reversed after the program. The size of the programmed fiscal adjustment is unprecedented for Sri Lanka, but necessary given that it started with one of the lowest revenue to- GDP ratios in the world after previous fiscal reforms were undone. For example, large real cuts to public sector wages and public pension payments amid high inflation in 2022 could prompt a backlash against the program from current and retired civil servants.

• Finalizing a restructuring agreement with all creditors in line with program parameters could be delayed. Realization of debt sustainability risks could require broader and deeper debt restructuring, raising significant risks to financial stability given banks’ substantial sovereign exposure, which in turn implies an additional fiscal burden.

• Implementation capacity. The broad scope of proposed reforms may pose risks to the authorities’ ability to implement their multi-faceted program.

Download Report: https://www.imf.org/-/media/Files/Publications/CR/2023/English/1LKAEA2023001.ashx

sheildskye

sheildskye
Manager - Equity Analytics
Manager - Equity Analytics

Interest rates are kept unchanged which has worsened the domino effect which started when the rate was increased in my opinion, at obscene levels. The FOMC (FED monetary governance committee) has made sure that they have control over all the central banks in the world, even though it seems like the comtrol doesn't exist. But India and Sri Lanka have atleast 10Million people only 4 meals a week (on average)

I have to thank Janet Yellen and all the other Governors of central banks around the world, 

THANK YOU FOR TURNING THE WHOLE WORLD IN TO A MADMAX MOVIE

reyaz

reyaz
Senior Manager - Equity Analytics
Senior Manager - Equity Analytics

sheildskye wrote:Interest rates are kept unchanged which has worsened the domino effect which started when the rate was increased in my opinion, at obscene levels. The FOMC (FED monetary governance committee) has made sure that they have control over all the central banks in the world, even though it seems like the comtrol doesn't exist. But India and Sri Lanka have atleast 10Million people only 4 meals a week (on average)

I have to thank Janet Yellen and all the other Governors of central banks around the world, 

THANK YOU FOR TURNING THE WHOLE WORLD IN TO A MADMAX MOVIE
You should also thank Ehud Olmert, Vladimir Putin, Vladamir Zelensky and Ebrahim Raisi to the 'vote of thanks'. They truely have gigantic egos they don't realise all the lives they are puting in jeapordy.

blindhog


Senior Equity Analytic
Senior Equity Analytic

Putin just an excuse. M2 money supply and negative interest rate should blame this bubble.

sheildskye likes this post

ResearchMan

ResearchMan
Manager - Equity Analytics
Manager - Equity Analytics

Global economy has been affected by negative interest rates, low interest rates and high interest  rates.  When everybody is betting for abnormally high prices for assets how are they going to solve inflation. Econmic cylce is repeating. This time is no different. 

atdeane


Senior Equity Analytic
Senior Equity Analytic

How low can the banks go guys? Most are trading at 0.26 og NAV. Eg- Bank with the highest market cap which is the COMB has a NAV of 168. EPS 20 and currently trading at 50-60. How low can they go? Selling at the current price is like selling them for free. Other banks are even more undervalued.

Quibit


Senior Vice President - Equity Analytics
Senior Vice President - Equity Analytics

atdeane wrote:How low can the banks go guys? Most are trading at 0.26 og NAV. Eg- Bank with the highest market cap which is the COMB has a NAV of 168. EPS 20 and currently trading at 50-60. How low can they go? Selling at the current price is like selling them for free. Other banks are even more undervalued.

Banks are expected to be amalgamated! Shareholders will lose value despite low PBV.

atdeane


Senior Equity Analytic
Senior Equity Analytic

Quibit wrote:
atdeane wrote:How low can the banks go guys? Most are trading at 0.26 og NAV. Eg- Bank with the highest market cap which is the COMB has a NAV of 168. EPS 20 and currently trading at 50-60. How low can they go? Selling at the current price is like selling them for free. Other banks are even more undervalued.

Banks are expected to be amalgamated! Shareholders will lose value despite low PBv
How can they lose value? Im talking abt the big three

Quibit


Senior Vice President - Equity Analytics
Senior Vice President - Equity Analytics

atdeane wrote:
Quibit wrote:
atdeane wrote:How low can the banks go guys? Most are trading at 0.26 og NAV. Eg- Bank with the highest market cap which is the COMB has a NAV of 168. EPS 20 and currently trading at 50-60. How low can they go? Selling at the current price is like selling them for free. Other banks are even more undervalued.

Banks are expected to be amalgamated! Shareholders will lose value despite low PBv
How can they lose value? Im talking abt the big three

The weakened banking and financial sector due to massive increase in NPLs, impairment of FX assets due to the now-certain ISB hair-cut, and further asset impairment due to the likely local debt re-structuring, would pose a highly dangerous situation that the authorities and banks are clearly not ready or equipped to deal with.

The local debt impairment could lead to irrevocable damage and destruction being inflicted on the EPF, ETF, NSB and the banking and insurance sectors which would surely lead to massive social tensions and perhaps even a serious political upheaval.

God Father


Senior Manager - Equity Analytics
Senior Manager - Equity Analytics

Banking sector crisis is imminent

Domestic Debt Restructuring will go ahead; President is honest to notify the investors that Intended Domestic Debt Restructuring (DDR) might result in the closure of the stock market in the event of banking crisis.  #Srilanka @CBSL
Details: bit.ly/3n96j95

Beyondsenses likes this post

DeepFreakingValue

DeepFreakingValue
Manager - Equity Analytics
Manager - Equity Analytics

Banking Sector amalgamations under the supervision of CBSL would be far better than any amalgamations under the supervision of SEC and CSE. (Eg. LOFC/NIFL where investors lost billions in share value)

Unfortunately, all amalgamations are likely to results in loss of value to shareholders, Banking sector shares are also would face the same consequences in the near future.

Beyondsenses likes this post

reyaz

reyaz
Senior Manager - Equity Analytics
Senior Manager - Equity Analytics

DeepFreakingValue wrote:Banking Sector amalgamations under the supervision of CBSL would be far better than any amalgamations under the supervision of SEC and CSE. (Eg. LOFC/NIFL where investors lost billions in share value)

Unfortunately, all amalgamations are likely to results in loss of value to shareholders, Banking sector shares are also would face the same consequences in the near future.

Makes you wonder why gama kadunu harak gaal cabraal gave somany licenses for too many finance companies and banks to operate?

Beyondsenses likes this post

Sponsored content



Back to top  Message [Page 1 of 1]

Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum